Do you ever wish you could read more books? Have you ever thought about writing articles at the professional level or authoring your own book? Bishop Robert Barron has read a library’s worth of texts, written fifteen books, and composed thousands of short works. In this episode of the Word on Fire Show, Bishop Barron offers helpful advice on how to improve your performance in the language arts.

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2 comments on “WOF 083: How Bishop Barron Reads and Writes

  1. Thanks so much! Just wondering, can you recommend which of Robert Sokolowski’s books to start with? For someone who is a beginner when it comes to philosophy…
    thanks!

  2. Ciaran guilfoyle Jul 12, 2017

    This is a question for any theologically minded souls out there. Something Bishop Barron said in this podcast about the process of writing a book got me thinking. he said something like ‘In the act of writing a book you reach a point where what you have created becomes ‘other”, ie. not simply an expression of your own subjectivity but something that begins to take on a life of its own.

    My question is this: how does this human creative process relate to the act of Creation that underlies the universe? Is it similar? In which case, does God find the world He has created taking on a life of its own and somehow opposing Him? Does this opposition to God stem from man’s free will and sinfulness, or is it a feature inherent in any created object? Ultimately, could this view turn into Gnosticism?

    Or is the creative ‘process’ dissimilar in God’s case? After all, the command ‘Let there be light’ does not suggest any process of wrestling with raw material, such as a writer goes through, and there was no ‘raw material’ to begin with in God’s case. So is His creation imbued with God Himself through and through? If so, how can we really distinguish between God and His Creation? Might we end up saying that God is His Creation? Ultimately, in this case, we end up with Pantheism.

    So how do we understand Creation in such a way as to avoid both Gnosticism and Pantheism?

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